Robbie Fulks

Nominated for two 2017 Grammy Awards: Best Folk Album (Upland Stories) and Best American Roots Song

Robbie Fulks

Phil Rosenthal

Sat, July 15, 2017

Doors: 8:30 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$15.00

Tickets at the Door

This event is 21 and over

Robbie Fulks
Robbie Fulks
In 1993, a songwriter banging around the Chicago club scene with a twangy voice and dangerous sense of humor caught our attention. We started making records with him, and as part of the first-generation Bloodshot roster, Robbie Fulks helped us define “Alternative Country.” In 2013, after two decades of playing music everywhere from the taverns of southern Illinois to the honky-tonks of northern Norway, from Austin City Limits’s soundstage to the historic Grand Ole Opry, he reunited with us for the highly acclaimed Gone Away Backward.

Upland Stories continues and — with sprinklings of pedal steel, drums, electric guitar, and keyboards — expands the sound of that acoustic set. Fulks’s richly emotional storytelling is illuminated by his instrumental prowess and emotional voice. At 53, he is philosophically reflective, writing “with clear eyes and a full heart” (Ken Tucker, NPR). Don’t get us wrong, his wit is still as quick as his picking; but it’s reflected through the lens of fatherhood, marriage, middle age, and the literary voices he is drawn to and draws from: Flannery O’Connor, Anton Chekhov, Mary Lavin, Frank O’Connor, Javier Marias, James Agee. Three new songs—“Alabama at Night,” “America Is A Hard Religion,” and “A Miracle” — are meditations inspired by Agee’s 1936 trip to Alabama, the sojourn that fueled his furious polemic on American poverty, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.

Coming of age in the 1960s and 1970s in Virginia and North Carolina, at the edge of the broad “upland” region referenced in the record’s title, also provided depth and detail for Fulks’s songs about the mysteries of memory, the vanishing of cherished things, and the struggles of everyday life. Robbie tries to make songs that offer more than verse-chorus-hook: songs that have space, calmness, unresolved tensions, and the hallmarks of lived experience. This sort of complexity is displayed in “Fare Thee Well, Carolina Gals,” an intimate folk song from the perspective of a man who has let life’s possibilities pass him by, and in “Never Come Home,” in which a sick man returns to spend his last days among an unwelcoming clan of pious, hard-bitten East Tennesseans.

Accompanying him is an incredible cast. Todd Phillips emerged in the 1970s as bassist in David Grisman’s and Tony Rice’s classic lineups. Frequent Bill Frisell collaborator Jenny Scheinman played violin, as did Shad Cobb (Osborne Brothers, Steve Earle, Willie Nelson). The two Chicagoans on the record are Flatlanders guitarist Robbie Gjersoe and trad-jazz drummer Alex Hall. The multi-faceted utility string wizard Fats Kaplin (Jack White) and legendary avant-gardist Wayne Horvitz (Naked City, Paul Taylor, Zony Mash) complete the extraordinary ensemble. Steve Albini, who began working with Robbie on Halloween night 1986, recorded the group’s live singing and playing on old German mics using a non-automated Neotek board, creating, as he always does, a provocatively unvarnished and analogically resonant stereo image.

Twenty years ago, Robbie’s exuberance for old-school country made a lot of noise. Today, his storytelling through folk and bluegrass music on Upland Stories delivers the quieter, sometimes unsettling truths of humanity.

“Some people get where they hope to in this world. Most of us don’t.” – James Agee
Phil Rosenthal
Phil Rosenthal
Phil Rosenthal is a nationally renowned singer, songwriter, recording artist and record producer. For many years the lead singer and guitarist in the popular bluegrass group The Seldom Scene, he is also highly respected for his instrumental skills on banjo and mandolin.
A native of Guilford, CT, Phil began his professional career in the 1970's as mandolin player and singer in the New England-based bluegrass bands Apple Country and Old Dog. In 1977, he joined The Seldom Scene, travelling widely with the group throughout the U.S., Europe, and Japan, including appearances at the Grand Old Opry and the White House. He recorded seven albums with the band, receiving a Grammy nomination for his work on Scene 20 . In 1986, he left the group in order to run American Melody, a recording company founded with wife Beth Sommers, devoted to producing bluegrass and folk music for children and families. The label's 22 releases thus far feature Phil and a variety of other noted performers, and have won many awards from the Parents' Choice Foundation, the American Library Association, and other organizations.
Phil is also a successful songwriter whose original compositions have been recorded by many artists including Johnny Cash, Bill Monroe, and Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds. In 1994, the Connecticut Commission on the Arts appointed him official Connecticut State Troubadour.
Phil performs currently as a soloist, and in the trio The Rosenthals with his daughter Naomi Sommers and son Daniel Rosenthal: www.therosenthals.org